NIMBY Documentary





Not In My Backyard” is a poignant documentary about battered women and homeless children in America. The film reveals how we live in an unjust and antiquated world where out of date laws never change, and leaders with closed viewpoints from the past remain in charge.

"I spent six years in shelters filming and interviewing Real Women and I will continue to do so for the rest of my life. Shelters break the Cycle of Violence."
Jacquelyn Aluotto, Director/Producer

"The average homeless child in America is nine years old, and over four women are murdered each and every day due to domestic violence. 50% of all homeless people are children and women, most fleeing abuse and trying to start a new life."
Not In My Backyard

"Not In My Backyard" presents a front-seat view into the perilous lives of the victims of domestic violence. Never before have cameras been allowed into the guarded world of underground shelters, so named because their location is hidden from the public to keep abusers at bay. The film tackles the very powerful, yet hidden social issue of domestic violence, and tries to understand the lives of abused and homeless women and children.

The documentary takes viewers into battered women and children’s shelters across America. Throughout the voyage, you will see the reality that these women, teens, and children face while they seek to survive in a country that ignores them. Through statistics, raw footage, interviews, archival footage, and taped statements, we asked “Why is this happening in our own neighborhoods? and “What can we do to change it?”.

NIMBY was created to raise much needed funding for shelters & safe havens that house victims of domestic violence, funding that can be used to help break the cycle of violence and provide victims the tools they need to make lasting change in their lives.

The Making Of The Film

The NIMBY Team goes inside the actual shelters to volunteer their time and help inspire the residents, whose lives have been torn apart because of domestic violence. Entering these “Safe Houses” is quite a feat because it is very difficult, almost impossible, for outsiders to build up the trust needed to enter these hidden facilities. The whereabouts of the residents must be kept secret, as their well-being and very lives are in jeopardy.

Directors Notes

“I feel honored to have met and befriended many of these individuals and I know their stories will really touch everyone who watches. My hope is that this film will inspire you and guide you to action to help us break the cycle of abuse in America, together. By giving whatever you can to the shelters that are trying to make a difference – we can save One battered woman & child at a time.”
Jacquelyn Aluotto, Director/Producer

Domestic violence crosses all socio economic lines and comprises all races and creeds.